Cheney: I didn't invite Trump to GOP retreat in Florida

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House Republican Conference Chairwoman Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyThe Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Facebook – All US adults can get vaccine; decision Friday on J&J vax Republicans who backed Trump impeachment see fundraising boost Freedom Caucus member condemns GOP group pushing ‘Anglo-Saxon political traditions’ MORE (Wyo.) said Tuesday she did not invite former President TrumpDonald TrumpHouse votes to condemn Chinese government over Hong Kong Former Vice President Walter Mondale dies at age 93 White House readies for Chauvin verdict MORE to address House Republicans at their policy retreat next week in Florida. 

Trump, who has been hunkering down at his Mar-a-Lago resort, is just a short flight away from Orlando, where Republicans are holding their annual gathering from April 25 to 27.

But asked by The Hill if Trump would be making an appearance, Cheney, one of 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump for his role in the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, volunteered: “I haven’t invited him.” 

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A Cheney spokesman said her comments were made in jest and that the Wyoming congresswoman doesn’t decide the lineup of speakers.

The retreat is sponsored by the nonprofit Congressional Institute, but Cheney and other members of the GOP leadership team set the agenda. Trump had addressed past House GOP retreats, including in Baltimore and at West Virginia’s Greenbrier resort, when he was serving as president. 

But the Republican Party has been at war with itself after the Capitol attack and in the post-Trump era. Cheney and a small faction of Republicans are urging the party to reject Trump and move on, while the majority of GOP lawmakers are embracing the former president, who remains a popular figure with the conservative base and is flirting with a rematch against President BidenJoe BidenObama, Clinton reflect on Mondale’s legacy Biden, Harris commend Mondale in paving the way for female VP Mondale in last message to staff: ‘Joe in the White House certainly helps’ MORE in 2024. 

Some of Trump’s most dedicated loyalists in Congress, Reps. Marjorie Taylor GreeneMarjorie Taylor GreeneRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene says she’s meeting with Trump ‘soon’ in Florida QAnon site shutters after reports identifying developer Republicans head to runoff in GA-14 MORE (R-Ga.) and Paul GosarPaul Anthony GosarGOP struggles to rein in nativism Former GOP lawmaker calls idea of ‘America First’ caucus ‘racism in a jar’ Republicans fret over divisive candidates MORE (R-Ariz.), had been discussing the launch of a pro-Trump “America First Caucus.” A draft policy platform for the caucus, reportedly drafted by staff, called for defending America’s “uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions” and infrastructure projects that reflect “European architecture.” 

The proposed caucus has been roundly condemned by Republicans across the political spectrum, including House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyWhite House readies for Chauvin verdict McCarthy to introduce resolution to censure Waters House GOP’s McClain responds to Pelosi calling her ‘that woman’ MORE (R-Calif.) and former Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerGOP struggles to rein in nativism Former GOP lawmaker calls idea of ‘America First’ caucus ‘racism in a jar’ The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Facebook – All US adults can get vaccine; decision Friday on J&J vax MORE (R-Ohio). 

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Speaking to reporters Tuesday, Cheney piled on in what were her first on-camera comments about the America First Caucus.   

“Any form of nativism or racism or anti-Semitism — those things are evil,” Cheney said in the Capitol. “And that’s got to be very clear, and we’ve got to be willing as Americans to call that out.”

Updated at 1:28 p.m.